Saturday, April 21, 2012

Motorhome Specifications

My motorhome is in the "Classic" category.  Here are all the significant specs. 
  • Brand: Glendale 
  • Series: Sterling
  • Model 237 CMH 
  • Class: C
  • Date of Manufacture: June 1988
  • Date of Purchase October 2001
  • Odometer on purchase 35,000 km.
  • Odometer Current: 75,000 km.
  • Chassis:   1988 Ford Econoline RV cutaway E350
  • GVWR 10,000-14,000 lbs.
  • Engine: Ford 8 cylinder gas 7.3 Litre, 460 cubic inches*. Oil capacity is 7 litres.
  • Paint Colour: 9M (White)
  • Fuel consumption approx 30 litres/100 KM or 10 Mpg. Imperial or 8 Mpg. US.*
  • Length: 24 feet
  • Width 97.5 inches, or 8' 1.5"; plus 10" total for mirrors =  just shy of 9'
  • Clearance 10' 6"
  • Fridge: Norcold 8663 3-way
  • Stove: Propane, Wedgewood T-2150-BG
  • Water Heater: Propane, Atwood G6A-3
  • Water Tank: 20 imperial gallons, or 87 litres
  • Holding tanks (Black and Grey) 10 imperial gallons or 44 litres each
  • Fuel Tank:  approx 100 litre
  • Propane Tank: Manchester 12x40, LP capacity approx. 40 lb. 
Some extras:  
  • Onan Generator - I installed this myself in 2002**
  • Air conditioner (roof mounted)
  • Dual roof vents with hail shields (AKA "vent covers")
  • Plexiglas storm windows (I made these myself)
  • Running boards on the cab
  • Awning

*That big engine is a fuel hog, to be sure.  but we are often in the mountains and have camped in some remote, hilly areas.  It can handle steep grades very well.  If this motorhome had the smaller 351 cubic inch, it would really struggle on hills and against the wind; furthermore it would probably not improve fuel economy enough to be worth the poor performance.  I am glad to spend a little extra on fuel in this case.


** The generator installation was far more difficult than I expected: I had to do some some serious electrical wiring and drop the motorhome's fuel tank to install a new fuel line.  


9 comments:

Anonymous said...

thanks for sharing, I'm looking at the 1988 22' model.

Denny Langlois said...

Hi, My name is Denny Langlois and we live
in Ontario, Canada. We bought our first motorhome last year. Its a 1988 Ford 28ft.
My wife and I were discussing the size of our fresh water tank, which is insufficient. I want to add another one somewhere. So I went on line to see if I could find out what size we already have and found your blog. Just want to tell you I really appreciate all the info you provided, Cheers, Denny & Carolyn

Dean J said...

Thanks for the feedback Denny! Good luck adding more water capacity. You'll also need waste water capacity as well, since all that water has to go somewhere after you use it! Otherwise the waste tanks will overflow. It's been a while since posting anything on this blog - the last couple of years have been crazy didn't allow much time to write posts. Will have more time this year for travel in the RV and writing a few blog posts.

Anonymous said...

Just an idea from an old RV builder, if you have additional room, install a separate grey water tank in addition to a sewage tank, grey water is easier to unload in many places that might not allow a sewage dump since it is lightly contaminated.

Karl Murphy said...

One trick if you do not have much bathroom traffic is to use an old fashioned commode with bag type commode liners, you can make your own liners out of kitchen garbage bags, this has many advantages, you do NOT accumulate sewage, you can use cheaper ordinary toilet paper, you can dispose of small commode bags same as you would dirty adult diapers, and grey water from your tanks is easier to dump as opposed to messy sewage, and far easier to repair grey water tanks.
Less hassle if your waste tanks rupture in an accident, I have resided in RVs for years and have proved all these tips.

Karl Murphy said...

Make sure if you buy a used RV to have your 110vac electrical inspected by a qualified electrician, some systems are homemade and unsafe, I am currently living in a homemade RV, and its electrical system had no circuit breaker panel or fuses and all outlets daisy chained on one line, to be plugged directly into an RV park or auxiliary home outlet, to make things worse, ordinary 12 gauge wire was run behind wood paneling increasing the risk of fire if the unprotected
( no circuit breakers ) circuits shorted !

Karl Murphy said...

One trick if you do not have much bathroom traffic is to use an old fashioned commode with bag type commode liners, you can make your own liners out of kitchen garbage bags, this has many advantages, you do NOT accumulate sewage, you can use cheaper ordinary toilet paper, you can dispose of small commode bags same as you would dirty adult diapers, and grey water from your tanks is easier to dump as opposed to messy sewage, and far easier to repair grey water tanks.
Less hassle if your waste tanks rupture in an accident, I have resided in RVs for years and have proved all these tips.

Karl Murphy said...

Another word of advice, do not try to live in an RV the same way you would if you lived in a regular fixed home, if you bear in mind that living in an RV requires different methods, then you will be several steps ahead in the game !

Karl Murphy said...

Another handy tip, modern diesel engines in good repair are superior to gasoline engines in RVs, also consider manual transmissions over automatic transmissions, and propane conversions for gas engines since propane is sooooo much cheaper than gasoline, and gets even cheaper in huge quanities, great if a large number of people form a cooperative and purchase a 1000 gallon tank and purchase in bulk, per gallon price can go as low as 80 cents per gallon.